Voting

Who hasn't heard about the famous douze points? The voting procedure of the Eurovision Song Contest is legendary. This page gives you both the basics as well as a detailed explanation of how the voting procedure works.

Voting in the Semi-Finals

Viewers at home and professional juries each determine half of the outcome of the two Semi-Finals of the Eurovision Song Contest. In each Semi-Final, 10 contestants qualify for the Final.

  • Viewers in all countries that are taking part in that particular Semi-Final are invited to vote via the official app, telephone and/or SMS. The voting window opens after the last song has been performed, and ends 15 minutes later. Televoters determine 50% of the outcome;
  • Professional juries in all countries that are taking part in or were allocate to that particular Semi-Final are required to vote. They also determine 50% of the outcome. The jury, which consists of five members (including a chairperson), is the same jury that will vote in the Final;
  • The EBU’s voting partner digame mobile GmbH (digame) will determine the national result by merging these two ranked lists, and will award 12 points to the country with the best combined rank of the jury and the televoting, then 10 points to country with the second-best combined rank, etc. The country ranked 10th in the combined ranking receives 1 point;
  • Since traditionally only 12, 10 and 8-1 points are being given, countries ranked outside of the top-10 do not receive points. Also, televoters and juries cannot vote for the country they represent;
  • If there is a tie between two or more songs in the combined ranking between televotes and the jury, the song that obtain a better ranking from the televote will prevail over the other;
  • Based on the combined full ranking of all songs of televoting and jury voting, each country will distribute 1 to 8, 10 and 12 points;
  • In the first Semi-Final, viewers and juries in Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom will also vote (as determined by draw). In the second Semi-Final, viewers and juries in Germany, France and Spain will also vote (as determined by draw);
  • The ten qualified countries will be announced at the end of each Semi-Final in the order decided by the Excecutive Supervisor of the Eurovision Song Contest. This order does not reflect the actual ranking on the score board;
  • The full score board will be made available shortly after the Final on www.eurovision.tv, to keep the excitement until the end of the Final.

Voting in the Final

  • In all 39 countries, the televoting and jury voting result in two ranked lists of all songs;
  • Televoters can vote via the official app, telephone and/or SMS. The voting window opens after the last song has been performed, and ends 15 minutes later. These votes determine 50% of the outcome and are gathered by the EBU’s voting partner digame;
  • Professional juries are also required to vote. They determine 50% of the outcome. The jury, which consists of five members (including a chairperson) is the same jury that voted in one of the Semi-Finals. They will watch live and rank all songs based on the second Dress Rehearsal, the so called Jury Final;
  • The EBU’s voting partner digame will determine the national result by merging these two ranked lists, and will award 12 points to the country with the best combined rank of the jury and the televoting, then 10 points to country with the second-best combined rank, etc. The country ranked 10th in the combined ranking receives 1 point;
  • Since traditionally only 12, 10 and 8-1 points are being given, countries ranked outside of the top-10 do not receive points. Also, televoters and juries cannot vote for the country they represent;
  • If there is a tie between two or more songs in the combined ranking between televotes and the jury, the song that obtain a better ranking from the televote will prevail over the other;
  • Based on the combined full ranking of all songs of televoting and jury voting, each country will distribute 1 to 8, 10 and 12 points; The combined results of jury voting and televoting will be presented on air during the Final by spokespersons in all participating countries. As usual, the points 1 to 7 will appear on screen. The spokesperson will then reveal 8, 10 and 12 points.
  • The combined split ranking of the televote and the combined split ranking of the jury vote will be published by the EBU’s Executive Supervisor of the Eurovision Song Contest on www.eurovision.tv within four weeks after the Final.
  • To protect the fairness of the voting, the EBU does not release the split ranking of televoting and jury per country. Publishing these numbers would explicitly highlight in which countries the televoting threshold – the minimum number of televotes needed to become a statistically valid result - is not met, and where thus only the jury voting was regarded valid. Explicitly highlighting these countries could lead to unwanted disproportionate influence on the televoting in these countries in future years to come.

About the jury voting

  • The jury voting is alwas monitored by an independent notary in each country;
  • The EBU’s voting observer PwC has the right to send an additional independent observer to the jury session;
  • The jury consists of a variety of members in terms of age, gender, and background;
  • All jury members must be citizens of the country they are representing;
  • None of the jury members must be connected to any of the participating songs/artists in such a way that they cannot vote independently. The participating broadcasters must send a letter of compliance with the voting instructions together with signed declarations by each jury member stating that they will vote independently;
  • The names of the jury members must be revealed by the relevant participating broadcasters during the Final;
  • Each jury member of each national jury must rank all songs in the show;
  • The combined rank of each country’s jury members determines the jury result of that particular country;
  • By judging each song each jury member will focus on the vocal capacity of the artist(s), the performance on stage, the composition and originality of the song, and the overall impression by the act.

About the televoting system

The Germany-based company digame mobile GmbH has been the EBU’s long-term voting partner since 2004. The company gathers all televotes and jury votes in all countries and is being closely monitored by two independent PwC observers. Its systems are build to handle all incoming votes according to the Rules of the Eurovision Song Contest, and can detect and exclude systematic bulk votes (also referred to as ‘power-voting’).